The site of Olympia, in a valley in the Peloponnesus, has been inhabited since prehistoric times. In the 10th century B.C., Olympia became a centre for the worship of Zeus. The Altis – the sanctuary to the gods – has one of the highest concentrations of masterpieces from the ancient Greek world. In addition to temples, there are the remains of all the sports structures erected for the Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia every four years beginning in 776 B.C.Read More
Ancient Olympia is a UNESCO site that must be included in everybody’s itinerary.Read More
There is no other ancient site that has more relevance on today’s world than Olympia.Read More
A pleasant 3.30 hour drive to a place that is still in our lives and should be included in everybody's itinerary.Read More
One day Olympia

1 day Mycenae-Nafplion-Epidaurus from 49.00 euro

April – October, the tour is organized on Mondays-Tuesdays-Wednesdays-Thursdays & Saturdays
November-March, the tour is organized on Tuesdays-Thursdays & Saturdays. NB: The negative point in low season is that Sites & Museums close at 15:00

Argolis is one of the longest occupied regions in Greece, with evidence of Neolithic settlements. Attractions such as Agamemnon’s fortress at Mycenae, the amazing theatre of Epidaurus, and the elegant city of Nafplion, draw huge crowds of people.

Highlights


Highlights of this tour: Corinth canal(photo stop), visit the mythical fortified city of Mycenae, walk in through the Lions’ Gate, see the palace of Agamemnon and the tomb of Atreus. In Epidaurus, visit the sanctuary of Asclepius(the god of medicine) and his daughter Hygeia, and experience the amazing acoustics of the 2500 years old theatre of Epidaurus. Contnue for a short photo stop in the romantic and beautiful “Venetian” old town of Nafplion.

Legendary MYCENAE – the city – founder of Mycenaean civilization
Mycenae was the kingdom of mythic Agamemnon, leader of the Greek troops in the Trojan War.
Myths related to legends and history have inspired poets and writers over the centuries from Homer and the Greek tragedians of the classical period.
The site was uncovered in 1874 by Heinrich Schlieman, who also found and excavated the site of Troy.
You enter the citadel through the famous Lions’ Gatestanding on lintleof 10 tons.

Beautiful NAFPLION – the “Venice of Greece”
Modern architecture hasn’t spoiled the old town of Nafplion, which is a feast for the eye. It was the capital of the Greek state in the early 1830s. Here, is the first residential place for the young Bavarian Prince, Otto, the first king of the new country after the revolution against the Turks. The old town is beautiful, with old mansions and paved roads. The town’s fortresses, the Palamidi and the Acronafplia, played a key role during the war of independence. The Venetian influence is everywhere justifying the town’s name as the “Greek Venice”.

The Amazing open theatre of EPIDAURUS
The priests of the sanctuary of god Asclepius were excellent surgeons. The administration of the sanctuary decided to build a theatre on the ground of the sanctuary, to entertain the patients.
Today, next to the sanctuary of Asclepius, there is a small museum, displaying the instruments and tools used by the priests to perform brain operations.

Itinerary, map and prices

TIME TOUR PLAN SERVICES
07:30 Start the pick up from the hotels. Departure from the terminal at 08.30
10:00 Arrival at Corinth canal. Short photo stop
11:15 Arrival in ancient Mycenae. Visit ancient site & museum
13:00 Lunch in a local restaurant. Lunch is optional. See the price paid.
14:15 Drive on to “Venetian” Nafplion. Short photo stop at Nafplion
15:15 Arrival at the site of Epidaurus. Visit the museum & the theatre
18:30 Arrival in the centre of Athens. Drop off at your hotel by 19:30

All the guided tours in Greece are organized by 3 big tour Operators and the travel agents sell the same tours at discounted prices.
Our discounted offers for the 1 day guided tour to Argolis, are:
1) The adult price, for the guided tour, NO lunch and NO entrance fees = 59.00 €
April-October entrance fees cost 24.00 euro extra. November-March entrance fees cost 12.00 euro extra.
Lunch costs 7.00 euro extra, added to the adult price.
2) The student price, for the guided tour, NO lunch and NO entrance fees = 49.00 €, (Student’s enabler price),
To avoid misunderstandings, please, CLICK and read what “enabler student” price means.
ONLY holders of International Student Identity cards are eligible to this price.

The prices quoted in the above price list, are in euro, per person, and include:
– transportation on modern air-conditioned buses
– Pick up / drop off from your hotel or near your hotel (See the list of hotels at the footer of the website)
– Services of the professional tour guide.

– Lunch and entrance tickets are optional and depend on the price that you decide to pay.

This ONE DAY TOUR TO ARGOLIS can be organized also as a private tour (cost shared between the passengers):
Transportation of 1-4 passengers = 260.00 euro. 5-8 passengers the extra cost is extra 10.00 euro per person.
In this private tour a) entrance fees, lunch, and drinks are not included in the price, and
b) a local professional tour guide, can be arranged to meet you at the extra cost.

In this private tour, entrance fees, lunch, and drinks are not included in the price.

Please, read the rules on HOW TO BOOK AND SECURE a booking that you find in the footer.
When we receive the message that the money have been deposited, we shall send you the voucher.
There is a cancellation deadline if the bookings are not paid on time.

 

 

History of Mycenae


Mycenae, the home of the Atreides royal family, is situated on a hill-top on the road leading to Corinth and Athens. The site was inhabited since Neolithic times (about 4000 BC) but reached its peak during the Late Bronze Age (1350-1200 BC), giving its name to a civilization which spread throughout the Greek world. During that period, the acropolis (= highest point of a city) was surrounded by massive “cyclopean” walls which were built in three stages (1350, 1250 and 1225 BC). The outer fortifying walls, are large stones and must still look similar to 3500 years ago when they were built.

We enter the citadel of Mycenae through the famous Lions’ Gate, because of the two lions above the entrance way, the first monumental sculpture in Europe (13th century BC). Immediately on to our right we come to Grave Circle A, a royal cemetery in which Schliemann found six shaft graves, 19 skeletons, and the incredibly rich burial furnishings which made his discovery one of the great archaeological finds of all time. This is where Schlieman found the ancient mask, which he called “the Mask of Agamemnon” but turned out to be the face of an unknown king from a period 300 years earlier. That mask is probably one of the most recognized ancient artifacts in the world and is still unofficially known as “the mask of Agamemnon”.

The rest of the site is interesting if you know what you are looking at, so take the time to read the material available in guidebooks. A ramp and stairs lead up from the grave circle to the palace on the top of the hill; unfortunately little remains of the palace except for a Great Court and a megaron (a room with central hearth and inner columns). The view when you get to the top of the hill is spectacular. You are really commanding the valley all the way down to Argos and Nafplion. From here you can follow a path down the back of the site to the Postern Gate and the Secret Cistern, a pitch-dark tunnel leading down some 80 steps through the solid rock. We can then return to the Lion Gate around the north side of the hill.

Outside the city walls, and across the road from Mycenae is the Royal grave or treasury of Atreus, which is one of the most impressive parts of ancient Mycenae. You walk through a passageway into an enormous bee-hive tomb dug into the ground. This is known as “a Tholos tomb” and this was the way the ancient Mycenaean’s began to bury their dead after the 15th century BC. The size of this tomb is incredible, and the stones are so massive that it’s believed that engineers who built Egyptian pyramids must have served as consultants when the Mycenaeans began constructing these “treasuries.”

A second tholos near the grave of Atreus was excavated by Mrs. Schliemann and is called the Tomb of Klytemnestra; it is one of the latest and most finely constructed of the tholoi. The third one called the Tomb of Aegisthus. is much earlier and its roof has collapsed. Returning down the modern road about a km we come to the most famous tholos, the Tomb of Agamemnon; the half-columns, which decorated its doorway, are in the Mycenaean Room of the National Museum.

Do not leave from the site without a visit to the museum of Mycenae. From the jewellery found in the graves some are displayed at the site’s museum and some in the Athens Archaeological Museum.

The myth of AGAMEMNON

In myth Mycenae was the home of Agamemnon, commander of the Greek army, which fought against Troy, and historically it was the most powerful Greek state during the last third of the Bronze Age (1600-1100 BC), which is why this period is called Mycenaean. Heinrich Schliemann excavated here in 1874-76 and found in Royal Grave Circle A the rich treasures which proves that Agamemnon really lived and that Homer’s story of the Trojan War was history, not myth.

The myth of Mycenae is the story of the Pelopid dynasty. Pelops, who gave his name to the Peloponnese (=Island of Pelops), had two sons, Atreus and Thyestes. Atreus, being the older son, became king of Mycenae but later he punished his brother, who had an adulterous affair with Atreus’ wife Europe, by forcing him to eat his two sons for dinner.

Atreus had two sons, Menelaus and Agamemnon, who married 2 sisters; Menelaus married Helen(the beautiful Helen of Troy) and Agamemnon married Klytemnestra. When Helen ran off with the Trojan prince Paris, Agamemnon and Menelaus became commanders-in-chief of the great expedition, which fought and won the Trojan War. When Agamemnon returned from the war, Klytemnestra was not overjoyed to see him; she had taken a lover (Thyestes’ son Aegisthus) and Agamemnon, who had earlier, at the beginning of Trojan war, sacrificed his daughter Iphigeneia so that favourable winds would blow his fleet to Troy, now drove up to the palace with his new concubine, the Trojan princess Kassandra. Klytemnestra therefore invited Agamemnon to come in and take a bath; she gave him a garment to put on (with no holes for his head and arms) and while he stood there with this bag on his head she killed him with three blows of an axe. Later Orestes, the exiled son of Agamemnon and Klytemnestra, returned to Mycenae and killed his mother to avenge his father; for his crime of matricide he was driven mad by the Furies (mythic emblems of guilt) until finally, in the Attic version, he was acquitted at the first Areopagus trial, under the Acropolis.

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